Creating Community

Pop Brixton, London

What do old shipping containers have to do with creating community? They can be re-purposed to provide sturdy protection for indoor gathering spaces, such as one I visited this past week in London.

Pop Brixton is an indoor-outdoor community space in the heart of the ethnically diverse south London neighborhood of Brixton (of David Bowie and Eddy Grant/”Electric Avenue” fame). Built of shipping containers on a previously empty, unused city lot full of concrete rubble, Pop Brixton is an incubator for community pop-up cafes, music and art events, an alternative school, a shared office/workspace (Impact Hub Brixton), a community garden, and even a community/people’s refrigerator named Freddie.  

“Freddie” the People’s Fridge

One of the Pop Brixton design features that struck me as being most effective was its central dining hall space with large, communal tables. This space was winterized when I visited, being enclosed and well-heated with portable gas heaters. Local artists (along with children from the neighborhood) designed and made the colorful banners hanging overhead, as well as the cleverly-constructed “fireplace” at the heart of the communal space. The fireplace is made of a plywood frame/”flames” with orange paper and lights—shown below in the two photographs. There were a few people sitting around engrossed with the solo glow of their smartphones, but the vast majority of people were talking and interacting in positive ways. 

Upstairs on the second floor (wheelchair accessible), was a lovely open seating area for quieter, more contemplative places for conversations (or nursing babies), surrounded by plants and more banners. 

Out back on the ground floor is the community garden (near Freddie the Fridge), the school, and the office-sharing/community-building space of Impact HUB Brixton. All of the small businesses housed in Pop Brixton are independent, with the majority being owned/operated by local community members. They actively promote social enterprises as well as having a Community Investment Scheme where all members donate at least one hour each week to use their time and skills to support local causes. 

One of the local agencies they support is Skye Alexandra House, a semi-residential home for vulnerable women aged 16-18 who have suffered abuse, imprisonment, prostitution, or disruptive foster care experiences. Pop Brixton supports their “Inspiring Butterflies” program, “a series of workshops that focus on personal development, life skills, awareness of sexual exploitation and domestic violence, bullying, money management, performing arts and enterprise.”

Pop Brixton is inspiring and welcoming and truly is a place where people make (positive, community-building) things happen. Out of boxes. 

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