God’s Will Scale

The One Slide: End of Life Questions
The One Slide: End of Life Questions (Photo credit: stevegarfield)

It’s official: they have a research scale for everything, including God’s Will. In dealing with my elderly father’s illness and end-of-life (EOL) decision-making/interface with the health care system, I kept remembering research I’d read about religiosity and EOL choices. Higher religiosity is associated with preference for life-prolonging medical treatments. This may seem counterintuitive at first, but perhaps people with higher religiosity are less likely to doubt the limits of medical science and our health care system. Researchers developed the Gods’ Will Scale to measure degree of religiosity (Winter, et al, 2009, Preferences for life-prolonging medical treatments and deference to the Will of God, J. Relig Health. 48: 418-430) The New York Times today has an interesting Opinion piece related to this topic: Why Do Americans Balk at Euthanasia Laws?  Contributors to this article point to the fact that the US population scores much higher on religiosity scales than do our peer nations. I should mention again that my father is a retired Presbyterian minister living in the conservative and highly religious state of Virginia.

I praise God and every other possible Higher Being that I live in a relatively enlightened state—that state being Washington State, which joined Oregon in the Death with Dignity Act. We also have a relatively active and from what I hear effective POLST Paradigm program: Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment Paradigm. POLST Paradigm program is designed to improve the quality of care people receive at the end of life. As they describe the program “It is based on effective communication of patient wishes, documentation of medical orders on a brightly colored form and a promise by health care professionals to honor these wishes.” From what I understand, POLST was started in response to complaints from patients that their EOL wishes as declared on Living Wills/Advance Directives were not being honored within the health care system. There have been cases of patients tattooing “DNR” (Do Not Resuscitate) on their chests in an attempt to have their wishes honored. Supposedly this works as long as rescue personnel bother to read their tattoo.

On the POLST website they describe patient-centered end-of-life care as, “Effective communication between the patient or legally designated decision-maker and health care professionals ensures decisions are sound and based on the patient’s understanding their medical condition, their prognosis, the benefits and burdens of the life-sustaining treatment and their personal goals for care.”

All people over the age of 18 are advised to have a Living Will/Advance Directives. In addition, people with a life-limiting illness should have a POLST. In Washington State POLST forms can be signed by physicians, nurse practitioners or physician assistants–that, of course, varies state to state according to their scope of practice regulations. Virginia has not yet adopted the POLST Paradigm.

In my opinion, my father has not received patient-centered end-of-life care. Instead, he received costly life-sustaining medical treatment and remains hospitalized in ICU. But at the same time, he is up and walking with help, complaining about the hospital food, and ready to get back to his work of taking communion to people in nursing homes. So, maybe it’s God’s will?

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