Transitions

Road cones
Road cones (Photo credit: Christchurch City Libraries)

Transitional care: part of care coordination across time and settings, specifically for patient populations at high risk for poor and costly outcomes as they cross health care settings.

There is the ideal (smooth, patient and family-centric) transitional care and then there is reality.

Case in point is my elderly father with congestive heart failure—the diagnosis associated with the highest Medicare health care costs. My father has been in four different health care settings over the past six weeks. These include an inpatient acute care hospital, a skilled nursing care/rehab facility, home nursing care, and as of today, home hospice. I have worked as a nurse in three out of four of the specific health care systems he has moved through. I know something about how they work—the key people to contact—the questions to ask—the code words to use to get things done. In spite of all that—plus flying cross-country to do much of this care coordination in person—it has been more than just difficult. As my father says, “There’s been a mix-up everywhere I go—it’s as if none of them communicate with each other.” Indeed, it shouldn’t be this hard. I keep wondering: how do people with fewer resources do this?

The metaphor for ‘good enough’ healthcare transitions that has occurred to me are those orange safety cones lined up re-directing traffic. Knowing the more ideal freshly paved road of smooth health care transitions is a ways off in the future, all I’ve yearned for are orange safety cones. I did finally see one bright orange safety cone today. It came in the form of a wonderfully compassionate male hospice nurse who spent over an hour patiently and respectfully talking to my father about quality of life–about what matters most to him and how hospice can help support him to pursue those things. Finally! Sanity and clear, direct communication from someone in the health care system. I thanked this nurse and asked him how long he’d been in nursing–14 years–and what he did before nursing–he owned/operated a bar. There are many paths to becoming a really great nurse.

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