Narrative Medicine “Closer” Close Reading In Practice

1384151134Over the past several weeks, in the narrative medicine (NM)  summer course I am teaching, we have been using the ‘closer’ NM close reading approach that I proposed in my last blog post: focusing on the elements of emotion, silence, surprise, and metaphor/imagery. I’ve also asked the students for written feedback on what it is like to use this closer reading technique, as well as how they envision incorporating what they learn from it into their practice as health care providers.

The course is offered through the innovative School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, Bothell Campus. The majority of the forty students in my course are nurses, most with Associate Degree preparation, who are now in their BSN completion program (finishing the equivalent of a four-year undergraduate degree program). It is a very diverse class in terms of age, gender, country of origin, ethnicity, race, years of work experience within health care, etc. Earlier in the quarter they all read/learned/practiced Charon’s close reading drill for narrative medicine: frame (includes gaps/silences), form (includes metaphor/imagery), time, plot, desire.

For in-class practice of the closer NM close reading approach, I used various poems from Between the Heartbeats: Poetry and Prose By Nurses, edited by Courtney Davis and Judy Schaefer (U of Iowa Press, 1995). “Burnt-out Offerings” by Sandra Smith with the stanza “We have become/those old crusty nurses/we used to pity and avoid.”–and Courtney Davis’ haunting “The Nurse’s Pockets” both resonated strongly with the students. I also used Kelly Siever’s more nuanced “Breath” and “Between the Heartbeats.”

Students commented that emotion and surprise in the poems were the easiest and most immediate for them to identify, and that metaphor and silence “…need more digging to discover and are more challenging.” Many of the students said that silence was something they had not considered before, that they found it intriguing but difficult. Overall, students felt this NM ‘closer’ reading approach was less technical, “less reserved and detached,” and that it “comes more easily and is something I can see myself using in practice.” One student wrote: “I can see this being used with patient interactions. Taking time to asses one’s reaction to a patient statement or story can prompt further questions, clarify biases, and create deeper understanding.”

I’m still refining how I teach this closer NM close reading approach, and especially how to guide students in how to listen for the silences, for whose voices and perspectives are heard and whose aren’t, and why.

 

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