Approaching Death

Check out Kimberly Condon’s essay “Approaching Death” (from the anthology I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse, edited by Lee Gutkind, In Fact Books 2013) reprinted today in Slate. In the Slate version the full title includes “A nurse goes from the ER to hospice, and changes the way she thinks about life and its end.”

Congratulations Kim!

Becoming A Nurse: Nurse Writer Panel Discussion

You are all invited/open to the public:

Becoming a Nurse

Nurse Writer Panel Discussion and Reading

Thursday April 18th 6-8:30pm

Suzzallo Library Smith Room

6-6:30 Light Refreshments

6:30-8:30 Panel Discussion, Reading, and Book Signing

I Wasn’t Strong Like This When I Started Out: True Stories of Becoming a Nurse

Edited by Lee Gutkind

In Truth Press. Pub. Date: April 2, 2013

This collection of true narratives captures the dynamism and diversity of nurses, who provide the vital first line of patient care. Here, nurses remember their first “sticks,” first births, and first deaths, and reflect on what gets them through long demanding shifts, and keeps them in the profession. The stories reveal many voices from nurses at different stages of their careers: One nurse-in training longs to be trusted with more “important” procedures, while another questions her ability to care for nursing home residents. An efficient young emergency room nurse finds his life and career irrevocably changed by a car accident. A nurse practitioner wonders whether she has violated professional boundaries in her care for a homeless man with AIDS, and a home care case manager is the sole attendee at a funeral for one of her patients. What connects these stories is the passion and strength of the writers, who struggle against burnout and bureaucracy to serve their patients with skill, empathy, and strength.

Panel will include an interview with Theresa Brown who writes for the NYT Well Blog. Participants include Josephine Ensign, DrPH, Associate Professor, Department of Psychosocial and Community Health, whose essay Next of Kin appears in the anthology.

This project was supported, in part, by an award from 4Culture  4culture_color

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